PRESENTATIONS & PUBLICATIONS

I have had the opportunity to write, present and facilitate discussions around art, activism, technology, design and social innovation. It’s been great to work with organizations and initiatives like the Power Plant (Toronto), OCADU’s Design With Dialogue (Toronto), Ottawa Art Gallery, Gallery 101 (Ottawa), SAW Video (Ottawa), Inuit Art QuarterlyC Magazine and others.

Below is a selection of some of that work.

2017

PHOTOGRAPHY: IN THEORY

I facilitated a “collective reading and discussion of an excerpt from Susan Sontag’s 1977 collection of essays On Photography” for the OAG (Ottawa Art Gallery). This evening brought together an interesting mix of community members who shared a passion for photography.

 

2016

INUIT ART QUARTERLY REVIEW OF FLOE EDGE AT GALERIE AXENEO7 (Gatineau, Quebec)

The National Capital Region has a very supportive art community; even so, the tightly-packed crowd at the AXENÉO7 Gallery was a sign that the opening of Floe Edge was a special event. The crowd included the artists and guests who had come to Ottawa for the Northern Lights Conference, as well as many locals who ventured out on a damp Tuesday night to see some of the best and most promising new work from the North. Floe Edge is a sexy show. In the main exhibition space, images of snow and ice are contrasted with sealskin stilettos by Nicole Camphaug and a sealskin bikini by Nala Peter, both Nunavut- based artists. These wearable art objects provide a wry critique on Southern expectations of Arctic fashion; they are hung prominently in the gallery’s back window and lit seductively to pique the curiosity of outsiders.

Read my full review…

ᓯᓈ / Dérives de glace / Floe Edge from Pink Tuxedo Productions

ᓯᓈ: ᓄᑖᑦ ᓴᓇᐅᒐᐃᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓴᓇᙳᐊᖃᑎᒌᑦᑐᑦ ᓄᓇᕗᒥ
Dérives de glace : Art contemporain et collaborations du Nunavut
Floe Edge: Contemporary Art and Collaborations from Nunavut

Presented by: AXENÉO7 and the Nunavut Arts & Crafts Association

The floe edge is an apt metaphor for the work of the artists presented in this exhibition, who—like the free-moving ice floes—have remarkably active and thoroughly intersectional practices that integrate personal, cultural, and historical narratives.

 

2015

SAW CITY DEBATE FOR OTTAWA ARCHITECTURE WEEK

I am invested in the cultural infrastructure of Ottawa and over the next few years this city has will undergo many changes that will impact those inside and on the peripheries of the arts community. It’s important to have dialogue around what this could mean. I was asked by SAW Video to participate in a panel discussion around the Arts Court redevelopment.

From SAW:

“As part of Ottawa Architecture Week 2015, the next SAW City Debate will pick up key points of last editions’ discussion about the future of Ottawa’s cultural spaces. Starting from the Ottawa Art Gallery Expansion and Arts Court Redevelopment the panelists will discuss the project’s implications for the local arts and cultural scene, as well as its larger impact on a regional and national level.”

Panelists:

Rachel Kalpana James (Visual Artist and Arts Administrator)
Kwende Kefentse (Cultural Developer, City of Ottawa + Other)
Barry Padolsky (Architect, Barry Padolsky Associates Inc.)
Leah Snyder (Editor of Mixed Bag Mag and Convener for We Are Cities)

Moderated by Penny McCann

 

REVIEW OF THE VENICE BIENNALE FOR C MAGAZINE’S QUESTIONING CITIZENSHIP EDITION

We have arrived at an intimate global moment. Populations displaced by war and resource extraction and Indigenous peoples are linked together in a complex embrace. Indigenous peoples have always been impacted by migration and as a result have devised and utilized political and social mechanisms, like wampum, to peacefully integrate newcomers into their communities. For Rickard the “Kaswhenta is a path from violence to peace” – a way out from under the oppression of nation states as well as a prototype for moving forward with equitable relations. Foregrounding the interventions of Indigenous artists within the landscape of the Biennale would have offered reinforcement to Okwui Enwezor’s curatorial proposition that art has the capacity to provide the world with both an exit as well as a future.

Read my full review…

 

2014

ART AS RESISTANCE PANEL DISCUSSION AT THE OTTAWA ART GALLERY IN COLLABORATION WITH THE PEOPLE’S SOCIAL FORUM

Art as a form of resistance is a major research focus of mine. I was invited by the Ottawa Art Gallery to moderate a panel of artists who use art to resist against government systems, environmental degradation, market economies and more.

From OAG:

“Beyond illustrating the issues at stake, can aesthetic forms themselves offer models for collaboration and movement building?

How do artists’ practices shift in response to revolution? Is a revolution a work of art?
What decolonizing strategies can we learn from artists performing and inserting their work in public space?

What role does spectacle play in creating an open space for dissent?”

Panelists:

Adam Brown (Ottawa)
Amira Hanafi (Cairo)
Scott Benesiinaabandan (Montréal)
Emily Rose Michaud (Montréal/Outaouais)

Moderator: Leah Snyder (Ottawa/Toronto)

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